Our Government

Somaliland Government

Over two decades, Somaliland has built a successful market economy, with GDP rising to $350 per capita – higher than Tanzania ($280), Eritrea ($190) and Ethiopia ($100). Somaliland’s private sector has enjoyed sustained growth, catalysed by low levels of regulation and a comparatively small government bureaucracy.

The government consists of three branches which are: the Legislative, the Executive and the Judiciary. The separation of the powers of these branches are as set out in the Constitution. Each branch exercises independently the exclusive powers accorded to it under the Constitution.

The state has an Executive Branch, which is separate and independent of the legislative and the judicial branches.The Executive Branch (sometimes referred to as “the Government”), is headed by the elected President and consist of the President, The vice-President, and the Council of Ministers appointed by the President.

Our Government

The government consists of three branches which are: the Legislative, the Executive and the Judiciary.

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Somaliland President

The Honorable Ahmed M. Mohamoud Silanyo.. Elected to office in July 2010 presidential election..

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Somaliland Vice President

Hon. Abdirahman Abdilaahi Ismail (Saylici) elected into office in the 2010 presidential elections of 2010…

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Our Government

Recognition

We are confident we will achieve our goal and we will never relinquish our rightful demand for international recognition. The sooner that aspiration is fulfilled, the better it will be for everybody in the region and the world at large.

Somaliland has quietly emerged as a reliable trading post along the Gulf of Aden, which World Bank Africa Region Chief Economist Shanta Devarajan has hailed as a “success story” in Africa. The World Bank has assisted in the recent production of “Doing Business in Hargeisa”. The report comments that despite conflict and fragility in the surrounding region, the “relative peace and security in Hargeisa in the past decade has allowed a vibrant private sector to develop” and “that the government has made strides setting up some of the institutions and rules necessary for businesses to operate”.